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The New Princeton Review, Vol. 5: January March May Forgotten Books

The New Princeton Review, Vol. 5: January March May

Forgotten Books

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331418719
Paperback
438 pages
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Excerpt from The New Princeton Review, Vol. 5: January March MayThe discovery of Sanscrit and the further discovery to which it led, that the languages now variously known as Aryan, Aryanic, Indo-European, Indo-Germanic, Indo-Celtic, and JapheticMoreExcerpt from The New Princeton Review, Vol. 5: January March MayThe discovery of Sanscrit and the further discovery to which it led, that the languages now variously known as Aryan, Aryanic, Indo-European, Indo-Germanic, Indo-Celtic, and Japhetic are closely akin to one another, spread a spell over the world of thought which cannot be said to have yet wholly passed away. It was hastily argued from the kinship of their languages to the kinship of the nations that spoke them- the student of comparative philology, or, as we may more briefly call him, the glottologist, projected a common parent-speech, from which the individual Aryan languages known to history were treated as derived. This, though beset with difficulties, was legitimate- but not so much can be said of the pendant to it in the supposed existence in primeval times of a tribe of which the Aryan nations, so-called, were to be regarded as the historical branches. The question then arises as to the home of the holethnos, or parent tribe, before its dispersion and during the pro-ethnic period, at a time when as yet there was neither Greek nor Hindoo, neither Celt nor Teuton, but only an undifferentiated Aryan. Of course, the answer at first was - where could it have been but in the East? And at length the glottologist found it necessary to shift the cradle of the Aryan race to the neighborhood of the Oxus and the Jaxartes, so as to place it somewhere between the Caspian Sea and the Himalayas. Then Doctor Latham boldly raised his voice against the Asiatic theory altogether, and stated that he regarded the attempt to deduce the Aryans from Asia as resembling an attempt to derive the reptiles of this country from those of Ireland.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.