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Cable and Satellite Carrier Compulsory Licenses United States Congress Administration

Cable and Satellite Carrier Compulsory Licenses

United States Congress Administration

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781332253951
Paperback
150 pages
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Excerpt from Cable and Satellite Carrier Compulsory LicensesThe subcommittee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:09 a.m., in room 2226, Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. William J. Hughes (chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.Present:MoreExcerpt from Cable and Satellite Carrier Compulsory LicensesThe subcommittee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:09 a.m., in room 2226, Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. William J. Hughes (chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.Present: Representatives William J. Hughes, Don Edwards, Jack Reed, Xavier Becerra, Carlos J. Moorhead, Howard Coble, F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr., and Bill McCollum.Also present: Hayden Gregory, counsel- William Patry, assistant counsel- Phyllis Henderson, secretary- and Thomas E. Mooney, minority counsel.Opening Statement of Chairman HughesMr. HUGHES. The Subcommittee on Intellectual Property and Judicial Administration will come to order.Good morning and welcome to todays hearing on H.R. 1103 and H.R. 759. These bills are identical in purpose, though not in scope. H.R. 759, introduced by our colleague Rick Boucher, a former member of the subcommittee, and by Mr. Moorhead, the distinguished ranking minority member of the subcommittee, amends the definition of cable system in section 111(0 of the Copyright Act to include wireless cable and other technologies.Title II of H.R. 1103 also amends section 111(0, but uses a generic definition to similarly include wireless and other technologies. This definition was taken from last Congress H.R. 4511, a general cable reform bill that Mr. Moorhead, Chairman Brooks, and myself introduced.The purpose of both H.R. 759 and H.R. 1103 is to provide a level playing field for new technologies that offer competition to traditional cable systems.By encouraging new forms of delivering television programming, we will increase consumers choices, improve service, and, hopefully, reduce costs.Recently, in drafting the new rules for the 1992 Cable Reform Act, the FCC noted a point Mr. Moorhead and I had emphasized in the last Congress: competition brings down prices.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.