Home » Pyrotechnics: Flare, Rocket Propellant, Rocket Engine Nozzle, Firecracker, Celebration of Light, Consumer Fireworks, Tracer Ammuniti by Source Wikipedia
Pyrotechnics: Flare, Rocket Propellant, Rocket Engine Nozzle, Firecracker, Celebration of Light, Consumer Fireworks, Tracer Ammuniti Source Wikipedia

Pyrotechnics: Flare, Rocket Propellant, Rocket Engine Nozzle, Firecracker, Celebration of Light, Consumer Fireworks, Tracer Ammuniti

Source Wikipedia

Published May 7th 2013
ISBN : 9781156792926
Paperback
56 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 54. Chapters: Abergavenny fireworks display, American Pyrotechnics Association, Bang snaps, Black match, Blue lightMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 54. Chapters: Abergavenny fireworks display, American Pyrotechnics Association, Bang snaps, Black match, Blue light (pyrotechnic signal), Boga (noisemaker), Celebration of Light, Colored fire, Colored smoke, Consumer fireworks, Electric match, Expansion deflection nozzle, Fantastic Fireworks, Firecracker, Fire art, Flame fougasse, Flame projector, Flaming sword (effect), Flare (countermeasure), Flare (pyrotechnic), Garden State Fireworks, Ghost Mine, Green Man (PGI), NFPA 1123, Party popper, Propellant, Pyrotechnician, Pyrotechnics Guild International, Pyrotechnic fastener, Pyrotechnic incidents, Pyrotechnic star, Reaction Fireworks, Rocket engine nozzle, Rocket propellant, Salute (pyrotechnics), Smoke bomb, Smoke grenade, Squib (explosive), Thermalite, The World Fireworks Championship, Tracer ammunition. Excerpt: A flame fougasse (sometimes contracted to fougasse and may be spelt foo gas) is a type of mine which uses an explosive charge to project burning liquid onto a target. The flame fougasse was developed by the Petroleum Warfare Department in Britain as an anti-tank weapon during the invasion crisis of 1940. During that period, about 50,000 flame fougasse barrels were deployed in some 7,000 batteries, mostly in southern England and a little later at 2,000 sites in Scotland. Although never used in Britain, the design was later used in Greece. Later in World War II, Germany and Russia developed flame throwing mines that worked on a slightly different principle. After World War II, flame fougasses similar to the original British design have been used in a number of conflicts including the Korean and Vietnam Wars where it was improvised from easily available parts. The flame fougasse remains in army field manuals as a battlefield expedient to the present day. Following the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940, Britain faced a critical shortage of weapons. In particular, there was a severe scarcity of anti-tank weapons, many of which had to be left behind in France. Nevertheless, one of the few resources not in short supply was petroleum oil since supplies intended for Europe were filling British storage facilities. Maurice Hankey then a cabinet minister without portfolio, joined the Ministerial Committee on Civil Defence (CDC) chaired by Sir John Anderson, the Secretary of State for the Home Office and Home Security. Among many ideas, Hankey brought out of his stable a hobby horse which he had ridden very hard in the 1914-18 war - namely the use of burning oil for defensive purposes. Hankey believed that oil should not just be denied to an invader, but used to impede him. Towards the end of June Hankey brought his scheme up at a meeting of the Oil Control Board and produced for Commander-in-Chief Home Forces Edmund Ironside extracts of his paper on experiments with oil in the First